Instead of repeating “my bag”, and ” my bag”, all the time, we can actually replace my bag and occasionally use “mine” instead.

Replace possessive adjective + noun.

. but the rest of the adjective is related to the number of the thing that is possessed.

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Remember the following rules when working with them: Possessive adjectives agree in number and gender with. IMPORTANT: The first letter is determined by the owner ( n = our; v = your, l = their) etc. Includes Answer Key! Click PREVIEW to see the worksheet better.

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In the second column are the possessive determiners that go with the masculine nouns. His reflects only the he is the owner, not the books (which are masculine, plural) or the car (which is feminine, singular). .

His reflects only the he is the owner, not the books (which are masculine, plural) or the car (which is feminine, singular). Ma soeur, my sister féminin singulier.

You say his books and his car.

Apr 19, 2023 · French Relative Pronouns – Exercises (les pronoms relatifs simples) When to use partitive articles in French; French Possessive Pronouns – Explanation and Exercises; French Stressed Pronouns (Exercises and Grammar) French Possessive Adjectives – Exercises and Grammar; Imperative in French (l’Impératif) – Conjugation and examples.

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I don’t know if this bag is yours or his. Nov 24, 2022 · Notice that to express our, your and their, you use the possessive adjectives notre/nos, votre/vos, leur/leurs, as following: Note the similarity of the forms.

Let's start with the possessive adjectives ( les adjectifs possessifs ).

. You say his books and his car. In French, they agree with the following noun.

Replace possessive adjective + noun. In French, they agree with the following noun. . class=" fc-falcon">Possessive pronouns = Mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, theirs. You say his books and his car.

This page offers a quick summary of.

His reflects only the he is the owner, not the books (which are masculine, plural) or the car (which is feminine, singular). French Grammar For Dummies.

The possessive adjective describes the noun, and.

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The possessive adjective always comes before the noun which is “owned,” just like in English.